Wednesday, February 26, 2014

Study Finds That Cats Demonstrate Attachment Behaviors Toward Their Owners Similar to Children's Attachment to Their Mothers

CINCINNATI, Feb. 26, 2014 Cats are often perceived as aloof and uninterested in human touch. A study by Claudia Edwards and colleagues in the Journal of Veterinary Behavior found that behavior in cats toward their owners is similar to the behavior of young children toward their mothers. Consistent with Attachment Theory first developed in the 1950s, Edwards' study found that when cats were in the company of their owners, they tended to be more relaxed and engaged in normal cat behaviors—exploring, wandering, and playing. But when the cats were in the company of a stranger, they spent more time waiting by the door and vocalizing less. The study suggests that our cultural perceptions of cats may be flawed. Of course, cat lovers already know this.

Three Norwegians is committed to creating a world where shelter cats and cats of families in financial need get the medical care required to return them to health, thereby increasing their chances of getting into forever homes and staying out of the shelter system.
To that end, Three Norwegians is launching the Save a Cat Facebook Contest. The Grand Prize winner will receive $435 in prizes, including $150 toward a veterinary service. The contest is part of a larger initiative started by writer and cat enthusiast, Kristen Heimerl, who is on a mission to help cats and cat families in need across the country.
Animal lovers can participate in the contest by going to the Facebook contest page at http://bit.ly/MVRqjE and submitting a short essay. Contest details and rules are available on the Gallery tab of the Buy a Book. Save a Cat. campaign site at: http://www.indiegogo.com/projects/buy-a-book-save-a-cat/x/6039173
About Three Norwegians
Three Norwegians is an organization devoted to helping shelter cats and cats of families in financial need get the medical care required to return them to health. The Bad Guy on the Block is Three Norwegians' new children's book featuring three amazing Norwegian Forest cats. A portion of every book sold goes to a cat in need of medical care. Learn more about Three Norwegians by visiting www.threenorwegians.com, www.facebook.com/threenorwegians or www.pinterest.com/threenorwegians.
Contact:
Kristen Heimerl
513-593-7575
Email
threenorwegians.com
Read more news from Three Norwegians.
SOURCE Three Norwegians


RELATED LINKS
http://www.threenorwegians.com

Wednesday, February 12, 2014

Brain Research Foundation Announces 2014 Scientific Innovations Awards (SIA) To Fund Groundbreaking Work In Parkinson's, Epilepsy, Hurler Syndrome And Autism

Producing important findings in a short timeframe is the goal of this special grant program

 

 

CHICAGO, Feb. 7, 2014.Brain Research Foundation (BRF) announced three recipients of its 2014 Scientific Innovations Award program (SIAs) for researchers investigating novel pathways to detect, treat and better comprehend serious neural diseases such as Parkinson's and schizophrenia.
"The innovation that these researchers bring to addressing the scientific understanding and potential treatment of devastating diseases is inspiring," stated Terre A. Constantine, Ph.D., and Executive Director of the Brain Research Foundation. "If this research proves these approaches successful, many areas of neuroscience will benefit."
The SIAs support innovative discovery in both basic and clinical neuroscience. This funding mechanism is designed to support creative, cutting edge research in well-established research laboratories, under the direction of established investigators. Descriptions of the work funded by the 2014 SIAs follow:
A "burst" is a brief period of high-frequency activity within neurons that can have a powerful impact on brain circuits. Symptoms in human diseases like Parkinson's and epilepsy are thought to be influenced by "overly-exuberant" bursting. With his 2014 SIA, Christopher I. Moore, Ph.D., Department of Neuroscience at Brown University, will conduct research to determine if biological strategies can be effective at modulating thalamic bursts. Data gathered may indicate potential for entire new treatment strategies, reducing or eliminating the need for intrusive and painful electrode implants.
Hurler syndrome is a genetic disease that manifests itself after birth through developmental delay, dwarfism, mental retardation and frequently death prior to ten years of age. With a 2014 SIA, W. Mark Saltzman, Ph.D., Department of Biomedical Engineering at Yale University, will attempt to correct the gene disorder in Hurler syndrome in mice by "editing" genes in utero using nanotechnology. The potentially transformative approach, if successful, can be applied to any single gene defect – such as Huntington's disease and Fragile-X syndrome.
Disruptions in neural circuitry cause many diseases such autism and schizophrenia. However, scientists' ability to study brain wiring has been greatly limited. Using a 2014 SIA, Anthony Zador, M.D., Ph.D., Department of Neuroscience, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, will test an innovative alternative to mapping neural connectivity. Rather than "take" a picture of brain wiring and connectivity through microscopy, Dr. Zador will "build" a picture or model through a unique DNA sequencing technique. The approach will be used to assess the brain wiring in a mouse model of autism. If successful, this technique can potentially be used to analyze neural circuitry disruptions in a great number of neuropsychiatric disorders.
The SIA Grants are specifically for projects that may be too innovative and speculative for traditional funding sources but still have a high likelihood of producing important findings in a very short timeframe. It is expected that investigations supported by these grants will yield high impact data and result in additional major grant funding and significant publications in key journals.
About the Brain Research FoundationThe Brain Research Foundation (theBRF.org) supports cutting-edge neuroscience research that will lead to novel treatments and prevention of all neurological diseases in children and adults. We deliver this commitment through research grants, which provide initial funding for innovative projects, as well as educational programs for researchers and the general public.
For more information: BRF contact:
Deborah Schneider
312.280.8702
Deborah@thekineogroup.com
SOURCE Brain Research Foundation


RELATED LINKS
http://www.thebrf.org